CLEARWATER’S GREAT HUDSON RIVER REVIVAL 2021

VIRTUALLY FREE JUNE 19th from 11AM – 11PM (ET)

Clearwater Festival (aka “The Great Hudson River Revival” or “Revival”) features powerful statements by life-long activists and organizations. The event will feature many musical performers, storytellers, and activists, including: Guy Davis, Larry Long, John McCutcheon, Tom Chapin, The Blind Boys of Alabama, Scott Ainslie, Donna & Rick Nestler, Matt Cartsonis, Betty and the Baby Boomers, Hubby Jenkins, Thomasina Winslow, Tiokasin Ghosthorse, Emma’s Revolution, Holly Near, Tom Paxton, R.J. Storm and the Old School Bluegrass Band, Mel & Vinnie, Reggie Harris, Diana Jones, The Trouble Sisters, Magpie, Rik Palieri and more. Consistent with Clearwater’s longstanding commitment to accessibility, the Revival programming is staffed with American Sign Language interpreters.

Inspired by Pete Seeger‘s desire to clean up the river over forty years ago, The Great Hudson River Revival initially helped raise the funds to build the sloop Clearwater, which has since become a world-renowned floating classroom and a symbol of effective grassroots action. Today, Hudson River Sloop Clearwater, Inc. is a non-profit organization that sails at the forefront of the nation’s environmental challenges. The revenue raised by the Revival goes to support Clearwater’s numerous educational programs and its work toward environmental and social justice—as well as keeping the sloop Clearwater afloat.

Please consider making a donation – your gift supports Hudson River Sloop Clearwater and makes possible future music festivals, sails, and Clearwater’s ability to bring together thousands in the name of clean water.

INDIGENOUS WOMEN ARTISTS AND THE 23RD POET LAUREATE OF THE U.S. JOY HARJO FEATURED IN “NO MORE PIPELINE BLUES (ON THIS LAND WHERE WE BELONG)” PRODUCED AND COMPOSED BY LARRY LONG

 

No More Pipeline Blues (On This Land Where We Belong) featured in RollingStone.com on April 20.

Mother Earth just received a lot of love from Indigenous mothers, grandmothers and others who teamed up in song, spoken word and video to push back against a new toxic, highly polluting tar sands oil pipeline. “Line 3” cuts through the heart of Native land and crosses more than 200 water bodies – including the Mississippi River twice – a drinking water source for millions of people downstream from the river’s headwaters, which begins in northern Minnesota.

Rock the Cause Records* in partnership with Honor the Earth and Larry Long have just released the audio single, “No More Pipeline Blues (On this Land Where We Belong)” featuring Waubanewquay, Winona LaDuke, Day Sisters, Mumu Fresh, Pura Fe, Soni Moreno, Jennifer Kreisberg, Indigo Girls, Bonnie Raitt and poet Joy Harjo.

Produced and composed by folksinger and activist Larry Long, the song will soon be available on multiple platforms including iTunes, Spotify, Tidal, YouTube and more!  You can hear and download the song now by going to larrylong.bandcamp.com.

Revealing the powerful efforts of water protectors to #StopLine3, the supporting music video is an action-packed mini-documentary, shining a spotlight on the Indigenous women-led resistance to the tar sands pipeline. Produced by Honor the Earth and Pickett Pictures, it is directed by award-winning filmmaker and photographer Keri Pickett  and posted to the Honor the Earth YouTube channel  will also be released underscoring the battle on the land and water and in the courts to #StopLine3.

Despite active, ongoing lawsuits in the Minnesota Appeals Court and in a Federal district court in Washington DC, the highly polluting pipeline is already half built.  Line 3 is owned by the Canadian multi-national, Enbridge, Inc., and dissects the heart of Anishinaabe territories and the most pristine and complex watersheds and ecosystems in the Land of 10,000 Lakes, including Lake Superior.

All Proceeds to Benefit the Non-Profit, Honor the Earth, and Water Protectors

“’No More Pipeline Blues’ beautifully illustrates in music, singing, spoken word and images the threats of a totally unnecessary tar sands pipeline at the end of the age of Big Oil. But it also illuminates the sacredness of our environment, and yet more destructive, historical impacts to Indigenous culture. Still, the song and the music video are also like prayer offered in ceremony, asking for strength, justice and preservation.”  – Winona LaDuke, Honor the Earth

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